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Homo Faber

Author : Max Frisch
Publisher :
Page : 0 pages
File Size : 39,15 MB
Release : 2022-12-27
Category : Fiction
ISBN : 9789357001441

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The protagonist of the book is Walter Faber, a middle-class UNESCO engineer who thinks the universe is logical and measured. Strange occurrences threaten his sense of security. He makes an impossible emergency landing in the Mexican desert, his friend Joachim hangs himself in the forest, he falls in love with a woman who dies of a concussion, and he engages in an incestuous relationship. Finally, stomach cancer strikes Faber, but it is too late for him to make any changes to his course of action.

Homo Faber

Author : G. N. M. Tyrrell
Publisher : Routledge
Page : 351 pages
File Size : 19,28 MB
Release : 2019-06-07
Category : Psychology
ISBN : 1000063763

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Originally published in 1951, Homo Faber is an examination of the scientific outlook on human mental evolution through the lens of parapsychology. The book aims to undermine what its terms, the ‘scientific outlook’ examining the human interpretation of the world, and the preconceived scientific concepts that reality does not extend beyond the realm that our senses reveal. The book expands upon this and moves to examine the broader human understanding of the entire cosmos, challenging the scientific conception that this can be grasped in principal by human intellect, arising from the chance combination of material particles. The book argues that the scientific outlook prevents humans from discovering in the Universe the meaning and purpose which are everywhere to be found if sought in the appropriate contemplative states of mind. This book provides a unique take on the examination of human psychology and the evolution of the brain from an alternative scientific stance. It will be of interest to anthropologists, historians and psychologists alike.

Homo Irrealis

Author : André Aciman
Publisher : Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Page : 256 pages
File Size : 29,5 MB
Release : 2021-01-19
Category : Literary Collections
ISBN : 0374720215

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The New York Times–bestselling author of Find Me and Call Me by Your Name returns to the essay form with his collection of thoughts on time, the creative mind, and great lives and works Irrealis moods are a category of verbal moods that indicate that certain events have not happened, may never happen, or should or must or are indeed desired to happen, but for which there is no indication that they will ever happen. Irrealis moods are also known as counterfactual moods and include the conditional, the subjunctive, the optative, and the imperative—all best expressed in this book as the might-be and the might-have-been. One of the great prose stylists of his generation, André Aciman returns to the essay form in Homo Irrealis to explore what time means to artists who cannot grasp life in the present. Irrealis moods are not about the present or the past or the future; they are about what might have been but never was but could in theory still happen. From meditations on subway poetry and the temporal resonances of an empty Italian street to considerations of the lives and work of Sigmund Freud, C. P. Cavafy, W. G. Sebald, John Sloan, Éric Rohmer, Marcel Proust, and Fernando Pessoa and portraits of cities such as Alexandria and St. Petersburg, Homo Irrealis is a deep reflection on the imagination’s power to forge a zone outside of time’s intractable hold.

Homo Faber

Author : Max Frisch
Publisher : HMH
Page : 229 pages
File Size : 27,94 MB
Release : 1994-05-01
Category : Fiction
ISBN : 054754037X

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A man who strives for pure rationality and control finds himself at the mercy of fate, in a “novel that speaks tellingly of loneliness, love, and despair” (Booklist). Walter Faber, engineer, is a man for whom only the tangible, calculable, verifiable exists. He is devoted to the service of a purely technological world. His associates have nicknamed him Homo Faber—“Man the Maker.” But during a flight to South America, Faber succumbs to what he calls “fatigue phenomena,” losing touch with reality—and soon he finds himself crisscrossing the globe, from New York to France to Italy to Greece. He also finds himself in the company of a woman who—for reasons he cannot explain or understand—strongly attracts him. The basis for the film Voyager starring Sam Shepard, this novel “capture[s] that essential anguish of modern man which we find in the best of Camus” (Saturday Review). Translated by Michael Bullock

Man in the Holocene

Author : Max Frisch
Publisher : Dalkey Archive Press
Page : 130 pages
File Size : 24,47 MB
Release : 2007
Category : Fiction
ISBN : 9781564784667

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"A luminous parable . . . A masterpiece." The New York Times

Homo Faber

Author : C.A. Alvares
Publisher : Springer
Page : 308 pages
File Size : 38,24 MB
Release : 1980
Category : Philosophy
ISBN :

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Where Are We Heading?

Author : Ian Hodder
Publisher : Yale University Press
Page : 199 pages
File Size : 25,86 MB
Release : 2018-08-21
Category : Science
ISBN : 0300240392

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A theory of human evolution and history based on ever-increasing mutual dependency between humans and things In this engaging exploration, archaeologist Ian Hodder departs from the two prevailing modes of thought about human evolution: the older idea of constant advancement toward a civilized ideal and the newer one of a directionless process of natural selection. Instead, he proposes a theory of human evolution and history based on “entanglement,” the ever-increasing mutual dependency between humans and things. Not only do humans become dependent on things, Hodder asserts, but things become dependent on humans, requiring an endless succession of new innovations. It is this mutual dependency that creates the dominant trend in both cultural and genetic evolution. He selects a small number of cases, ranging in significance from the invention of the wheel down to Christmas tree lights, to show how entanglement has created webs of human-thing dependency that encircle the world and limit our responses to global crises.

Jan Fabre

Author :
Publisher :
Page : 38 pages
File Size : 16,70 MB
Release : 1995
Category :
ISBN :

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The Public Realm and the Public Self

Author : Shiraz Dossa
Publisher : Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
Page : 169 pages
File Size : 46,33 MB
Release : 1989-02-21
Category : Political Science
ISBN : 0889209677

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On pp. 28-36, "The Holocaust, " and pp. 125-141, "Eichmann, " discusses a reinterpretation of the controversy over Arendt's views on the origins of totalitarianism, the "guilt" of the Jews and the "evilness" of Eichmann. Suggests that one has to interpret Eichmann's behavior as that of a "private" man entering the public realm, aiming to achieve private self-interests. Contends that use of this terminology and way of thinking can explain Arendt's apparent inconsistencies in her views on the Holocaust.

Perspectives on Gender in Post-1945 German Literature

Author : Georgina Paul
Publisher : Camden House
Page : 270 pages
File Size : 49,27 MB
Release : 2009
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN : 1571134239

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Rooted in Enlightenment rationalism, modernity tends to privilege masculine-connoted characteristics -- conscious subjective agency, rational control and self-containment, the subjugation of nature -- and has generated a conceptualization of human subjectivity emphasizing these qualities. Yet the costs of this conception of human selfhood are high, and at modernity's most acute moments of historical crisis writers and artists can be seen turning to feminine-connoted figurations -- nature, tradition, myth and spirituality, intuition, relationality, flux. In recent decades studies have examined the cultural crisis of German modernity, notably at the turn of the nineteenth to the twentieth century, as a crisis of masculinity. Feminist critiques, meanwhile, have viewed cultural history as male-generated and "phallocentric," in need of a feminine corrective. The innovation of this book is to examine these two gendered perspectives side by side, investigating the culturally symbolic significance of gender in post 1945 German language literature via a sequence of paired readings of major, thematically related texts by male and female authors, including Ingeborg Bachmann's novel Malina (1971) and Max Frisch's Mein Name sei Gantenbein (1964); Frisch's Homo Faber (1957) and Christa Wolf's St rfall (1987); Elfriede Jelinek's Die Klavierspielerin and Rainald Goetz's Irre (both 1983); and Heiner M ller's Die Hamletmaschine (1977) and Christa Wolf's Kassandra (1983). Finally, Barbara K hler's eight-poem cycle "Elektra. Spiegelungen" (written 1984-85; published 1991) is considered as offering a way past the "impasse" of the male and female viewpoints. Georgina Paul is University Lecturer in German at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of St. Hilda's College.